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CELIAC DISEASE TESTING: What You Need To Know

CELIAC DISEASE TESTING: What You Need To Know
People have lots of questions about how to get tested, if they should get tested and what if the tests come up negative but you feel it is wrong?

The full celiac panel from Celiac.com is:

  • tTG IgA and tTG IgG
  • DGP IgA and DGP IgG
  • EMA IgA
  • Total serum IgA
  • AGA IgA and AGA IgG (older and less reliable tests)
  • Make sure you are eating gluten until testing is done,
  • Many celiacs are low in some nutrients such as calcium, iron, ferritin, potassium, zinc, A, D, B12, and copper.
  • Bone density can be an issue and should be checked.
  • Thyroiditis as symptoms similar to celiac disease, as well as being associated with celiac disease. Getting checked for hypothyroidism is often helpful.
Here is an interesting article from Dr. Sheila Crowe, a professor in gastroenterology and hematology at the University of Virginia, to answer those questions in detail.

The ABCs (and TTGs) of Celiac Disease Testing

First, by definition, a diagnosis of celiac disease requires abnormal microscopic findings in small intestinal biopsy specimens. One exception to this rule occurs when a patient has a skin condition known as dermatitis herpetiformis, in which case a characteristically abnormal skin biopsy result can substitute for checking intestinal biopsies.

Since getting an intestinal biopsy is not necessarily the first test anyone wants to undergo, it is fortunate that several blood tests are helpful during the initial steps of diagnosing celiac disease. These blood tests measure antibodies – usually IgA or IgG – that are made by immune cells to two main proteins.

One protein is an enzyme called tissue transglutaminase, or TTG, that is found in many cells of our body. TTG is released from the damaged intestine during active celiac disease, and antibodies to TTG are found to be elevated in the blood of most patients with untreated celiac disease.

The other protein to which the body’s immune system responds to abnormally in someone with active celiac disease (and occasionally in some other disorders) is a group of proteins found in gluten called gliadins.

FULL ARTICLE HERE


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