Nut-Free Dible

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Nut-free Cheat Sheet

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A take-it-with-you guide to common nut sources.

foods to watch 

almonds

 peanuts*

walnuts 

nut butters

pecans

nut pastes

hazelnuts 

nut oils

cashews 

nut extracts

macadamia 

nut flours

heart nut

 bush nut

hickory nut 

butternut (but not butternut squash)

pine nut 

coconut***

filbert nut 

ginko nut

beechnut 

lichee nut

nangai nut

pistachio

shea nut

nut paste

anacardium nuts

Nutella

artificial nuts

mashuga nuts

nut meal

nougat

pili nut

marzipan

praline

nut distillates/alcoholic extracts

natural nut extract

walnut hull extract

 chinquapin nut

 nut meat

   

common hidden sources  

baked goods 

 cookies

candy

chocolate, chocolate bars

pastries 

nougat

cereals

marzipan

granola, granola bars

grain breads

chex mix 

energy bars

chilis and soups (peanut is often used as a thickener) 

honey

African and Asian cuisine**

mortadella (may contain pistachios)

meat-free burgers

 pesto

gravy

salad dressing

glazes and marinades

flavored coffee

barbeque sauce

cold cuts**

calisson

almond chicken

pad thai

gianduja and giandula (chocolate blended with hazelnuts)

satay

nut meats

vegetarian dishes

breadings

 cereal

 ice cream/frozen desserts

alcoholic beverages (e.g. amaretto, frangelico, orgeat)

cheese spread, cheese balls

maraschino cherries

salads

vegan puddings

vegan creamy soups

words to watch 

hydrolyzed plant or vegetable protein 

 see this list for botanical and derivative names of tree nuts

non-food sources 

bean bags

hackey sacks

bird seed

cosmetics

hair products

sun screen

massage oil

pet food

lotion

insect repellant

kitty litter

stuffed toys

saddle oil

hoof cream/oil

wooden kitchenware (often finished with walnut oil)

toothpaste

face scrub

 

*If you are allergic to tree nuts, you may also need to avoid peanuts. In addition, many peanut products are produced on equipment that is also used for tree nut products, increasing the risk of cross-contact. Consult your doctor about whether you should avoid peanuts as well.
**May sometimes contain nuts.
***According to The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), "Coconut is not a botanical nut; it is classified as a fruit, even though The Food and Drug Administration recognizes coconut as a tree nut.  While allergic reactions to coconut have been documented, most people who are allergic to tree nuts can safely eat coconut.  If you are allergic to tree nuts, talk to your allergist before adding coconut to your diet."
Last modified on Monday, 12 May 2014 17:13
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